Not-so-Happy Hour: The Link Between Alcohol & Allergies Pinnacle ENT Blog

Alcohol intolerance is a genetic condition where an individual’s digestive system cannot properly break down the substance. An alcohol allergy and alcohol intolerance are two different conditions. We will also look at what causes alcohol allergies and review the differences between alcohol allergy and intolerance. This generally falls under the umbrella of alcohol flush reaction. While your skin turns bright red and you can’t stop scratching the hives you’ve broken out into, don’t be surprised if your heartbeat has skyrocketed and you feel slightly dizzy. This is incredibly uncomfortable, and you probably will have the feeling that you need to sit down for a second. Alcohol isn’t exactly the most soothing thing to put in your stomach, especially in large quantities.

signs you're allergic to alcohol

To make a diagnosis of allergy, a healthcare provider will first take a medical history and do a physical exam. A reaction to histamine can occur after drinking red wine. In some cases, an allergic reaction can be severe and lead to anaphylaxis. Verywell Health articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and healthcare professionals. These medical reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research.

Why Do I Get Cold-Like Symptoms After Drinking Alcohol?

Genetic tests can also be done to evaluate if there are problems with the genes that make alcohol dehydrogenase. However, this is not always the cause of alcohol intolerance. Alcohol intolerance is not the same as an alcohol allergy. While both of these conditions cause unpleasant symptoms after using alcohol, the cause of these symptoms is very different. Alcohol intolerance is due to the buildup of acetaldehyde, which is caused by a problem affecting alcohol dehydrogenase. Alcohol allergy occurs when someone’s immune system reacts to the presence of alcohol, causing the body to attack the alcohol. Most alcohol allergies are actually a reaction to a component of the alcohol, such as grapes, hops or wheat, instead of the alcohol itself. Symptoms and severity of symptoms can vary from person to person. Symptoms include severe rashes, difficulty breathing, nasal congestion, stomach cramps, or collapse. If you are someone who has food allergies or asthma, you are more likely to have a reaction to alcohol.

signs you're allergic to alcohol

Having alcohol intolerance doesn’t preclude you from struggling with alcohol addiction. What happens in such a case is that you experience even more severe consequences than the average person with alcohol addiction. When the ALDH2 enzyme is inactive or less active, your body doesn’t do a proper job at making this final conversion, resulting in the symptoms you experience if you have alcohol intolerance. When you drink alcohol, your body uses an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase to break down the alcohol. Do you start to feel nauseous or sick after consuming even the most negligible amounts of alcohol? Do you feel unusually warm or notice that your skin turns pink? A person experiencing a severe allergic reaction should go to the emergency room immediately. If the allergic reaction is more severe, people may require epinephrine, also known as an EpiPen. A person with severe allergies should carry one with them at all times, in case of a serious allergic reaction. A skin prick test should take place in a medical setting in case of a severe allergic reaction.

Common Food Allergens in Alcoholic Beverages

Symptoms are more likely to be a reaction to the ingredients in a drink, or the alcohol causing other types of allergies to worsen. For example, alcohol may exacerbate preexisting asthma conditions. A skin test can determine whether you might have an allergy to something in alcoholic beverages — for example, the grains in beer. Your skin is pricked with a tiny Sober Home amount of a substance that could be causing your reaction. If you’re allergic to the substance being tested, you’ll develop a raised bump or other skin reaction. Alcohol flush reaction is an extremely uncomfortable way your body informs you that you’re allergic to alcohol. Your face, neck, and chest turn bright red, and everything gets warm to the touch.

What happens when you take antihistamines for too long?

Long term use of some antihistamines may increase your risk of dementia. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl®) blocks the effects of a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. This neurotransmitter is vital for memory and learning.

Often, a true alcohol allergy is termed alcohol intolerance. Although research is limited, people with a true allergy to alcohol should avoid drinking. Research indicates that the enzyme, aldehyde dehydrongenase, metabolizes alcohol in the liver into acetic acid . A person who has an allergy to vinegar can then have a severe reaction to the alcohol. Others can have a polymorphism in the ALDH gene, which renders aldehyde dehydrongenase inactive and makes it impossible to convert alcohol signs you’re allergic to alcohol to acetic acid. The second type of intolerance or allergy is more common among the Asian population, and symptoms may include flushing, nausea, and rapid heartbeat. If you experience redness, swelling, nausea, or a headache after you drink, the problem may not be as simple as a hangover. You might have an allergy or intolerance to alcohol—or some of the ingredients used to make the spirit you’re drinking. You don’t need to be allergic to alcohol to feel ill after a night of drinking.

Alcohol Allergy or Alcohol Intolerance

Read the ingredient lists of foods and drinks, ask restaurant staff for information about menu items, and avoid products that contain alcohol. Sometimes, the symptoms of alcohol intolerance may seem like an allergic reaction. You could feel your face becoming red or flushed or you develop hives and feel your nose getting stuffy. Your blood pressure may also drop and your heart may palpitate. You may also develop a headache after a binge and some stomach discomforts. These are chemicals released by the immune system help the body to get rid of allergens. When you consume something you’re allergic to, histamines are released in the body, which can cause congestion, runny nose, and itchy, watery eyes. People with alcohol intolerance may be especially sensitive to red wine and other alcoholic beverages that contain high levels of histamines. Although a true alcohol allergy is rare, and the reaction can be severe, most allergic reactions to alcohol are due to an ingredient in alcohol.

If anything below rings true for you on a regular basis, schedule an appointment with your doctor. It would be easy to confuse these symptoms with alcohol poisoning, but the Mayo Clinic says they can be a sign of allergy or intolerance. People with both asthma and an alcohol allergy may find that their respiratory symptoms worsen when they drink. “Up to a third of people with asthma complain that wine will worsen their asthma, and less often with beer or spirits,” explains the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. If you develop symptoms after drinking alcohol, make an appointment with your doctor. Depending on your symptoms, they might refer you to an allergist for testing and treatment. An allergist is a special type of doctor that focuses on allergic conditions. People often call alcohol intolerance an alcohol allergy, and vice versa. People who have a true alcohol allergy should avoid drinking alcohol entirely. In some cases, reactions can be triggered by a true allergy to a grain such as corn, wheat or rye or to another substance in alcoholic beverages.

Celebrities Who Don’t Drink

Drinking a small amount can help people feel relaxed, but too much, too often, can be harmful for health. We adhere to structured guidelines for sourcing information and linking to other resources, including scientific studies and medical journals. Our content is fact checked by our senior editorial staff to reflect accuracy and ensure our readers get sound information and advice to make the smartest, healthiest choices. Ask your doctor for more information about your diagnosis and treatment options. Morozova, Tatiana V.; Mackay, Trudy F.C.; Anholt Robert R.H. “Genetics and genomics of alcohol sensitivity.” Molecular Genetics and Genomics, January 7, 2014.

  • A person can be born with alcohol intolerance, but it can also be caused by certain medications or medical conditions.
  • Mild alcohol intolerance may not require a trip to the doctor.
  • If you have allergies to liquor, you might get red flushes on your face, neck, chest, or arms when you drink.
  • Healthline has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations.
  • All of these tests will help your doctor rule out any other conditions that may be causing your adverse reaction to alcohol.

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